Anna Shinoda

Learning Not To Drown: Available Now

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Learning Not to Drown in stores now!

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Die Mitte Von Allem

Die Mitte Von Allem cover

On January 20th, Die Mitte Von Allemthe German translation of Learning Not to Drown was released.   Me being classic me has been trying to think of what to write for my blog post about it for a little over two weeks.  (Now you know why it took me ten years to write a novel.)

Every time I tried writing this post, one consistent thought came to mind:  It’s weird having a book translated into a language I can’t read.  It’s completely and totally bizarre.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not a bad weird.  I’m thrilled.  But it’s still strange.

So how did this translation come about?  Last May my editor at Atheneum emailed me the news that they had made my first foreign sale to Magellan in Germany.  This fall, while on a visit to Berlin, I met with my publisher and my publicist.  I found out that the title would be Die Mitte Von Allem (The Middle of Everything) and was shown this beautiful cover – which, by the way, I love.  It could not be more different from the original, but it feels right.  It feels like Clare’s story is behind that cover.  As strange as it is to have it translated into words I can’t understand, it blows my mind that Clare and Luke and Peter… and Skeleton… are now living in another language.  Thanks Magellan, translator Petra Koob Pawis, and all the German readers choosing to spend some time with the Tovin family.

Forever Stuck Between Love and Fear: The Inspiration Behind Learning Not to Drown

“What inspired you to write Learning Not to Drown?” is the first question I’m asked in interviews.

I sometimes say that the United States incarcerates more of their population than any other country in the world.  Or that we spend a million dollars each year to incarcerate the residents of a single city block.  I might note the war on drugs has done very little to keep people from doing drugs and has contributed to the over-crowding of our prisons.  I could talk about the 3.2% of the US population-  almost 2 million citizens of my country- that are either incarcerated or on probation.

But the real reason I wrote a about a girl who has a brother in prison is because my brother is in prison.

A long time before the book came out, I was already thinking about how I might answer the “what inspired you” question.  Even writing this blog post has taken me months and several drafts to figure out what I want to say.  And although I was (and still am) nervous about admitting the truth, I decided that it is better that it come from me than someone finding it and feeling like they’ve found buried treasure.

So when I’m, asked, I am honest… and then most of the interviewers get all sidetracked.  They want to know how much of the story is me and how much is fiction. I tell them that if I wanted to, I would have written a memoir, but I decided to write a work of fiction out of respect for my family. I talk about how writing is like making a smoothie. How my husband and I go out to the garden and pick some kale and grind it up, then we add bananas, yogurt, strawberries, peaches and blueberries. How it all becomes part of the mix and it is impossible to separate the kale – the me – from the other stuff – the research and imagination. But unfortunately, it doesn’t matter. The moment I say I have a brother in prison, like my protagonist Clare, the most interviewers have already concluded that Clare’s story and mine are one in the same, intertwined, names have been changed to protect the innocent.

And they are wrong.

Yes, having a brother in prison made me the first resource for researching this book.  But when I started looking outside my own story, I wasn’t just researching to write a book. I found myself searching to understand who “we” are – the families out there like mine, who struggle to fake perceived “normal” while hiding our actual “normal.

In high school I never talked about having a brother in prison.  He was quite a bit older than I was, and being the youngest of seven kids, it was easy for my oldest siblings to blend into each other in my friend’s eyes.  It was easier for me, most days, to forget where he was, the only reminder that I had that seventh brother was the last picture taken before he was locked up that hung in my dad’s photography studio, right in line next to the rest of our family.  That, and the letters, or the collect phone calls.  No matter how much I tried to pretend or forget, the truth was always waiting for me.

While researching, I found no shortages of documentaries and journalists covering problems with our current prison system.  And I was amazed how people on message boards or chat rooms spilled their feelings behind the comfort of their keyboards, the protection of anonymity.  The thing that surprised me the most?  The openness my own family and friends showed when I told them about Learning Not To Drown, and the stories they told about themselves, about their incarcerated loved one.

There were stumbling blocks along the way.  In my research, I dug up new information on my own brother  – something that I didn’t know before… facts that threw me into a depression so deep and so wide I didn’t know if I could find my way to the surface.  But with the help of a good therapist and by helping Clare come to terms with her own situation, I eventually did.  Just weeks before the release of the book, I found out more information.  Which brought me to another realization: most families don’t know the whole truth.  We will never know the whole truth.

There are approximately two million people in the US correctional system today.  My book is about their mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, aunt, uncles, cousins, wives, husbands, sons, daughters, and friends.  It is for the ones who live in the greyest area of all – where crime and punishment isn’t as cut and dry as good guys and bad guys.

Learning Not to Drown isn’t about me, it is about the families, the friends, the lovers, the children. The ones left at home. The ones forever stuck. Stuck between believing the people we love and believing the victims. Stuck between hope and reality. Stuck between love and fear. All the while, hoping to find a way to refuse to let the sunlight be stolen from our lives.

Guess Who Turned Six Months Old Today???

Oh Learning Not to Drown, it feels like just yesterday that I was anxiously awaiting your arrival, pacing my office with on the phone with my editor, agent and  publicist, obsessively checking Goodreads for any reviews, preparing for a my very first book signings and parties with.. itchy skin and an upset stomach… as well as brand new sharpies.  And look how grown up you are now!

I’m 6 Months Old!!

Maybe it was because of the sheer amount of people who came to welcome you into this world or maybe it was from the lack of sleep when you arrived, but  I kind of forgot to post pictures here of your first week in this world.  It’s a good thing, actually, I was so wrapped up with being in the moment of having my debut novel come out that I forgot to chronicle your arrival.

So to celebrate your 6th month birthday I am finally posting pictures of your release week.

Read more…

Want Learning Not to Drown published in your country? Let my publisher know!

Many of you around the world continue to ask me via various social media outlets if Learning Not to Drown will be translated and released in your country.  Other than Germany (release date TBA), there aren’t plans for international releases yet, but my publisher is working on it.

As much as I love hearing that you are excited about my book and want it in your language, there isn’t much I can do about it… but…

You can help!

My editor wants to hear from you!  She wants to know where in the world people are interested in Learning Not to Drown.  And, if she has letters from you, she can bring them into acquisition meetings to show that there are already readers who want the book in those areas.  That can make a huge difference.

If you want to see Learning Not to Drown in your country, write a letter to my editor using the contact form here:

PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT THIS FORM MORE THAN ONCE!   Thank you!

Behind the Cover: The Incredible Photography of Kelia Anne MacCluskey

 

2p_learning_jkt-version-21.jpgBehind every cover is not just the story written by the author, but also one of how the visual representation of that book came to be.  This is the story of how Learning Not to Drown ended up with its incredible cover.

EDWIN USHIRO To Counter Imponderability

EDWIN USHIRO To Counter Imponderability

You might be surprised to hear that most authors get little to no say in what their covers look like.  Since I can be really pickycontrolling, hands-on, I wanted to give my suggestions on what I’d like to see.  I also am very aware that I don’t know anything about what makes a good cover for a book and the professionals Atheneum/Simon & Schuster definitely do, so I timidly asked my editor if I could give them a small list of some artists that I thought would represent my work well.  My editor told me that YA books usually have photos on the front, but, decided to give an illustration a chance.  It turns out that Edwin Ushiro was on both my list and theirs.  He painted a beautiful swimmer inspired by Clare, surrounded by water both dark and light, tumultuous and calm.  I immediately hung his painting in my office across from my desk, where I could easily be inspired by Edwin’s art. But, early testing of the cover came back with some tough results – most people thought the book was mid-grade, not YA.

Michael McCartney at Simon and Schuster got to work on designing another cover for Learning Not to Drown while I continued to work on edits… and continued to have stress nightmares about my cover.

When the final jacket came to me, I fell in love.

Although the photo was taken years before my book was completed, it looked like it had been created just for Learning Not to Drown.  I instantly looked up the photographer – Kelia Anne MacCluskey –  and almost passed out when I discovered that she took the photo WHEN SHE WAS ONLY SIXTEEN.

I haven’t been able to meet her yet in person, but I was able to connect with her via email and do an interview. After finding out more about Kelia, I was even more impressed – not only is she the photographer (at that time largely self-taught), but she also was the model, AND she taught herself how to use photoshop through online tutorials and experimentation.  She is a true artist, and I look forward to see much more of her work in the future.

AS: I love that the photo looks almost like a painting.  Can you tell me a little about the process from taking the photo to manipulating it?

Read more…

LNTD’s First Translation: German!

This morning I woke up to some great news: Learning Not to Drown is being translated into German and will be published by Magellan GmbH & Co. KG!  I’ve got a fair amount of German blood in my body, making this an especially proud moment for me.

They aim to publish within the year, but it might take up to eighteen months.  As soon as I get a specific date, I will let you know.

I made the announcement on twitter and immediately my notification feed was filled with questions about when it will be translated into other languages and released in other countries.

And the answer:  I have no idea.  I wish it were as easy as seeing a message from you and *BAM* it would appear perfectly translated in your language in your country.  The process can be complex, but my editor and the foreign sales department over at Atheneum are working on additional foreign contracts, and hopefully the future will hold more translations for Learning Not to Drown.

For now, Amazon ships internationally (as well as some independent book stores)  if you’d like to read my book in English.

 

Mike Shinoda’s LEARNING NOT TO DROWN Playlist

Ready for something fun?

In a movie, everything is completed for you and handed to you – music, details of the setting, what the characters look like, how their voices sound.  But books let the reader finish the story, fill in the details based on their own experiences and tastes.   So, when my friends over at Atheneum/Simon & Schuster asked me if I’d like to put together a soundtrack for Learning Not to Drown, I politely declined.  I don’t want to tell anyone what kind of music Clare and her friends might be listening to because part of the magic is that the readers can fill their soundtrack.

However, when I told my husband Mike about the idea, he got excited.  “I want to do that.  It’d be fun to put together a playlist of what I think Clare would listen to.”

So….if you are wondering what songs were bouncing around in Mike Shinoda’s head when he read Learning Not To Drown, here is his playlist:

Read more…

Read the First 6 Chapters of LEARNING NOT TO DROWN Now!

Hello!  I woke up to the news from my publisher that we are going to share a little taste of LEARNING NOT TO DROWN with you!  An exclusive excerpt is living here: http://bit.ly/1fz4VRp

AND…

If you want a chance to win a finished copy of my debut, LEARNING NOT TO DROWN, you can head on over to Goodreads  to enter this giveaway! http://bit.ly/1fVvbGJ

Learning Not to Drown – Less Than a Month Away!

After 10 years of working on my debut novel, Learning Not to Drown I finally get to share it with you in less than a month!

The book comes out on April 1st, and we’ve started to schedule some discussions and signing.  So far, the week of my debut I’ll be in Los Angeles and New York.  I’ll also be speaking on a panel at the LA Times Festival of Books.  All dates will be updated as they come in on my events page here and on Facebook.

If you are interested in pre-ordering the book, call your local independent bookstore, or check out some other options on the Learning Not to Drown page on the Simon and Schuster website.  For now, the book will be released in the USA in English only, but international orders can be taken through Amazon and shipped to your country.

Book Club Message

To everyone who has participated in Book Club: Thank you! I thoroughly enjoyed reading along with you and hearing your opinions during our discussions.  I loved being exposed to new authors – thanks to those of you who suggested books and voted – and I hope you liked the selections I picked out as well.

In case you missed it: at our last meeting, I announced that I would no longer be able to host our book club. With Learning Not to Drown being released soon, trying to finish my next book, and spending time with my family, I have run out of spare hours.

Thank you again for making book club great!  

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